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'''Werk Nr 191301''' is a [[:Category:Messerschmitt Me 163|Messerschmitt Me 163 B-1a]].
{{Airframe info
 
|name='''''{{PAGENAME}}'''''
 
|image=[[File:Messerchmitt-me-163b-191-301-at-wright-field-display-in-october-1945.jpg|thumb|300px]]
 
|caption=191301 at Wright Field, October 1945.<ref>https://acesflyinghigh.wordpress.com/2017/01/28/the-survivors-messerschmitt-me-163-komet-the-devils-sled/</ref>
 
|designation=[[:Category:Messerschmitt Me 163|Messerschmitt Me 163]]
 
|version=B-1a
 
}}
 
   
 
=History=
 
=History=
After it's capture, 191301 arrived at Freeman Field, Indiana, during mid-1945, and received the foreign equipment number '''FE-500'''. On 12 April 1946, it was flown aboard a cargo aircraft to the U.S. Army Air Forces facility at Muroc dry lake in California for flight testing. Testing began on 3 May 1946 in the presence of Dr. Alexander Lippisch and involved towing the unfueled Komet behind a Boeing B-29 Superfortress to an altitude of 9,000–10,500 m (29,500–34,400 ft) before it was released for a glide back to earth under the control of test pilot Major Gus Lundquist. Powered tests were planned, but not carried out after delamination of the aircraft's wooden wings was discovered. It was then stored at Norton AFB, California until 1954, when it was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution.
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After t's capture, 191301 arrived at Freeman Field, Indiana, during mid-1945, and received the foreign equipment number '''FE-500'''. On 12 April 1946, it was flown aboard a cargo aircraft to the U.S. Army Air Forces facility at Muroc dry lake in California for flight testing. Testing began on 3 May 1946 in the presence of Dr. Alexander Lippisch and involved towing the unfueled Komet behind a Boeing B-29 Superfortress to an altitude of 9,000–10,500 m (29,500–34,400 ft) before it was released for a glide back to earth under the control of test pilot Major Gus Lundquist. Powered tests were planned, but not carried out after delamination of the aircraft's wooden wings was discovered. It was then stored at Norton AFB, California until 1954, when it was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution.
   
 
The aircraft remained on display in an unrestored condition at the museum's Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland, until 1996, when it was lent to the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum in Pooler, Georgia for restoration and display but has since been returned to the Smithsonian and as of 2011 is on display unrestored at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington D.C..
 
The aircraft remained on display in an unrestored condition at the museum's Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland, until 1996, when it was lent to the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum in Pooler, Georgia for restoration and display but has since been returned to the Smithsonian and as of 2011 is on display unrestored at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington D.C..
 
=Sources=
 
<references/>
 
[[Category:World War 2]]
 
 
[[Category:Messerschmitt Me 163]]
 
[[Category:Messerschmitt Me 163]]
 
[[Category:FE Coded Aircraft]]
 
[[Category:FE Coded Aircraft]]
 
[[Category:Needs Picture]]

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