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Captured Wings Wiki
(Amendment)
Tag: sourceedit
(9U -> 9P, more pictures. Notes do not survive an edit, so I altered the text to include them.)
Tag: Visual edit
 
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{{Airframe info
[[File:WTF209.jpg|thumb|400px|T2-3002 as flown in US Markings]]
 
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|name='''''{{PAGENAME}}'''''
'''T2-3002''' was a [[:Category:Yakovlev Yak-9|Yakovlev Yak-9U]]
 
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|image=[[File:WTF209.jpg|thumb|300px|]]
 
|caption=T2-3002 as flown in US Markings
 
|designation=[[:Category:Yakovlev Yak-9|Yakovlev Yak-9]]
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|version=Yak-9P
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}}
   
 
=History=
 
=History=
Originally operated by the DPRKAF (North Korean Air force),{{#tag: ref|Possibly as Black 32|group="N"}} T2-3002 (original serial unknown) was found in airworthy condition by Marines at Kimpo airfield on 17 September 1950, and subsequently shipped to USA for evaluation, arriving at Buffalo for rebuild by the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory. The Yak-9U was assigned the serial number T2-3002, with the first flight in US hands occurring on 21 September 1951. The aircraft accumulated 23 hours and 55 minutes of flying time in all, making it's last flight on 12 December. Following the conclusion of the tests, the Yak-9 was allotted to the USAF Museum in the mid-1950s. Sadly, due to lack of storage space, it was scrapped in 1958.{{#tag: ref|Interestingly, it is alleged that the Yak was offered back to the Soviet Union as a gift by the USAF!<ref>http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/394/language/en-CA/WTF.aspx</ref>|group="N"}}
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Originally operated by the DPRKAF (North Korean Air force), possibly as Black 32<ref>Panek, Robert. ''Yakovlev Yak-9U & P''. Redbourn : Mushroom Model Publications, 2006. ISBN 83-89450-27-5. pp.32, 112</ref><ref>http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Markings/yak9p/yak9p-1.php</ref> T2-3002 (original serial unknown) was found in airworthy condition by Marines at Kimpo airfield on 17 September 1950, and subsequently shipped to USA for evaluation, arriving at Buffalo for rebuild by the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory. The Yak-9P was assigned the serial number T2-3002, with the first flight in US hands occurring on 21 September 1951. The aircraft accumulated 23 hours and 55 minutes of flying time in all, making it's last flight on 12 December. Following the conclusion of the tests, the Yak-9P was allotted to the USAF Museum in the mid-1950s. Sadly, due to lack of storage space, it was scrapped in 1958. Interestingly, it is alleged that the Yak was offered back to the Soviet Union as a gift by the USAF!<ref>http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/394/language/en-CA/WTF.aspx</ref>
[[File:WTF244.jpg|thumb|225px|left|T2-3002 as originally found]]
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<gallery>File:WTF244.jpg|A Yak 9P of the DPRKAF found by US Marines
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file:T2-3002 taking-off.png|T2-3002 taking off
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file:T2-3002 yak9P.png|T2-3002 on the ground</gallery>
 
=Notes=
 
=Notes=
<references group="N"/>
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<references group="N" />
 
=Sources=
 
=Sources=
<references/>
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<references />
 
[[Category:Korean War]]
 
[[Category:Korean War]]
 
[[Category:Yakovlev Yak-9]]
 
[[Category:Yakovlev Yak-9]]

Latest revision as of 16:03, 6 November 2017


History[]

Originally operated by the DPRKAF (North Korean Air force), possibly as Black 32[1][2] T2-3002 (original serial unknown) was found in airworthy condition by Marines at Kimpo airfield on 17 September 1950, and subsequently shipped to USA for evaluation, arriving at Buffalo for rebuild by the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory. The Yak-9P was assigned the serial number T2-3002, with the first flight in US hands occurring on 21 September 1951. The aircraft accumulated 23 hours and 55 minutes of flying time in all, making it's last flight on 12 December. Following the conclusion of the tests, the Yak-9P was allotted to the USAF Museum in the mid-1950s. Sadly, due to lack of storage space, it was scrapped in 1958. Interestingly, it is alleged that the Yak was offered back to the Soviet Union as a gift by the USAF![3]

Notes[]

Sources[]